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Archive

Wasim Jaffer first to cross 10,000-run mark in Ranji Trophy history

Vidarbha opener Wasim Jaffer became the first cricketer in Ranji Trophy history to notch up 10,000 runs on day two of their Group A match against Bengal at the Jadavpur University second campus ground in Salt Lake on November 7.

Having made his debut for Mumbai in 1996-97, Jaffer needed eight runs to reach the milestone, which he got with an elegant drive to long off boundary against Bengal seamer Veer Pratap in the penultimate delivery of eighth over.

His Vidarbha teammates gave a standing ovation as he acknowledged the feat. This is for the first time a batsman scaled the peak since the tournament's inception in 1934-35.

The 37-year-old reached the milestone in his 126th match and the former Mumbai opener is now the leading run-getter in Ranji, Duleep and Irani Trophy having amassed 10,002, 2545 and 1008 runs.

Source:PTI


Maharashtra to be first state to enact law against social boycott

Maharashtra will be the first state in the country to enact a law against social boycott of individuals or families by caste panchayats.

A draft of the said act called as the ‘Maharashtra Prohibition of Social Boycott Act, 2015’ which was published on the state government’s website on Wednesday has termed any action of social boycott as crime.

Maharashtra in recent times has witnessed an increased number of incidents of social boycott and violence at the orders of seniors in the caste panchayats, for not adhering to their rules. Slain rationalist Narendra Dabholkar too had picked up the issue before his murder in Pune. A number of activists and academics have been demanding an act against the foul practices of caste panchayats for years.

This won’t be the first time that the state is taking a lead in formulating such acts. Maharashtra was also the first in the country to enact anti superstition law.

Source:The Hindu


Novel insulin pill to effectively manage diabetes

Indian-origin researchers in US are developing a novel insulin pill that can provide a painless and more effective blood sugar management option to those who suffer from diabetes.

The drug delivery technology may also apply to a wide spectrum of other therapies, researchers said. "With diabetes, there's a tremendous need for oral delivery," said Samir Mitragotri, a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of California - Santa Barbara. "People take insulin several times a day and delivery by needles is a big challenge," said Mitragotri, who specialises in targeted drug delivery.

For those who do not like needles, the discomfort injections can pose is a huge barrier to compliance, said Amrita Banerjee, a postdoctoral researcher in the Mitragotri Lab. "It can lead to mismanagement of treatment and complications that lead to hospitalisation," she said.

A pill could circumvent the discomfort associated with the needle while potentially providing a more effective dose, the researchers said. "When you deliver insulin by injection, it goes first through the peripheral bloodstream and then to blood circulation in the liver," Mitragotri said. Oral delivery would take a more direct route, he added, and, from a physiological point of view, a better one.

Source: DNA


Winged guests to get warm welcome in Sultanpur

Home to 250 different bird species, Sultanpur bird sanctuary is all set to welcome the new migratory birds. For taking care of migratory birds, the officials of Indian Forest Department have installed CCTV cameras. “We maintain the data of visitors manually. To keep an eye on the activities of the people in sanctuary, the administration has installed CCTV cameras,” said an official.

“Birds come here due to habitable conditions. And they come from Europe, Siberia and Central Asia,” said Piyush Sharma, ornithologist and wildlife photographer.

Sharing interesting facts about how birds find their way, Sharma said in autumn, the adult female comes first on their nesting ground and they are followed by adult male, while in spring the order is reversed. He said nocturnal migratory birds are guided by the major constellation of stars.

Sameer, a Delhi University student studying the behavior of migratory birds, said nearly 20,000 migratory birds throng the park in winter season.

“Greater Flamingos, Ruff, Black-winged Stilt Siberian Cranes, Common Teal, Common Greenshank, Northern Pintail, Northern Shoveler, Rosy Pelican and White Wagtail are among the species which come to the sanctuary,” he said.

Red Watt Land, Sand Woodpecker are the popular migratory birds in Sultanpaur bird sanctuary, he said.

The sanctuary, which is famous for its migratory as well as native birds, has 180 resident birds.

Source:The Pioneer


Astronomers in U.S. watch the birth of a new planet

Astronomers have observed for first time a planet taking shape out of microscopic dust particles 450 light years from Earth. The primordial process that turns enormous clouds of cosmic dust into newborn planets over millions of years has been observed directly for the first time.

Astronomers caught sight of a planet in the making around a young star in the neighbourhood of Taurus 450 light years from Earth.

The discovery is a boon for scientists who have never before had a real star system against which they can check theories of how the universe came to be dotted with different worlds.

“This is our first chance to watch the planet formation process happening,” said Stephanie Sallum, a graduate student at the University of Arizona.“We can go and look at this and do more detailed studies now, to try to understand how planets are built.”

Although nearly 1,900 alien worlds have been spotted beyond our solar system, none are still forming. And with no growing planets to gaze at, scientists can only compare their models for how planets are born with the end results, such as fully mature rocky worlds and gas giants.

Source: The Hindu

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